Freelancing

What We Learned From The Global Survey On Freelancing – Forbes

Summary

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I’ve received a great many requests to share the findings of the Global Survey on Freelancing, the first truly global freelance survey co-sponsored by my Agile Talent Collaborative and the University of Toronto, and conducted from March-June 2021. The full report came out a few weeks ago and is available here. In total, seventy-seven freelance platforms, agencies and professional communities joined us as research partners and 1900 freelancers took part, a wonderfully diverse cohort including a tremendous variety of freelance specia…….

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Getty

getty

I’ve received a great many requests to share the findings of the Global Survey on Freelancing, the first truly global freelance survey co-sponsored by my Agile Talent Collaborative and the University of Toronto, and conducted from March-June 2021. The full report came out a few weeks ago and is available here. In total, seventy-seven freelance platforms, agencies and professional communities joined us as research partners and 1900 freelancers took part, a wonderfully diverse cohort including a tremendous variety of freelance specializations and over 30 countries. Here, in summary, are nine insights from the survey results and accompanying research.

1.   Freelancing is a work and career innovation that’s succeeding world-wide, though at different rates of speed

Freelancers are busy, engaged, and optimistic.  Our survey found over 60% or more of freelancers have enough or too much work, report satisfying relationships with clients, say they’ll meet their financial goals, and remain committed to freelancing. These data fit well with demand trends: Over 90% of companies depend on freelancers and plan to increase their use.  Markets and professional specialties vary – some regions and industries are more mature than others – but, overall, freelancing is a global force.

2.   The freelance revolution is large and growing

More of so many professions in so many countries. Our survey participants work in every continent: 16% Latam, 11% Africa, and 8% Asia. Our 77 freelance marketplaces  hailed from Singapore and Spain, Chile and the Czech Republic, Russia and Benin, Australia and South Africa, and many more countries. Together with a growing freelance support ecosystem – tech products and services but also finance, business services, travel and events – the industry delivers well more than a trillion in global GDP.   

3.   There is no one “type” of freelancer

Some freelancers are young genius techies who work all hours, sending in code from a beach house in Bali or some other exotic place. That’s true, but massively incomplete.  Our survey shows a spectacularly heterogeneous community: Full stack developers and optical computing experts, but also musicians and rocket scientist, architects and engineers, film documentarians and diplomats, physicians and executive coach, I-bankers and airline pilots. Many of our freelance respondents are side-giggers, augmenting their income or trying freelancing out. A full 30% of our freelancers were 50+ Baby Boomers; some making a career-shift, others are in-between jobs. As freelancing grows, the diversity of freelancers by age, gender, location and profession also grows. 

4.   Freelancing is a source of public good

Matt Barrie, CEO of Freelancer.com, describes freelancing is an economic engine connecting talent and opportunity. We learned it does that and more. Contra offers a way out of poverty for a Bangladeshi artist. Flexing It creates a path for Indian tech freelancers to show their expertise to colleagues at top global companies around the world. Mash aids a Swiss watch giant to grow and expand in Thailand, creating new jobs. Fintalent offers M&A professionals a freelancing …….

Source: https://www.forbes.com/sites/jonyounger/2021/10/26/what-we-learned-from-the-global-survey-on-freelancing/